Monthly Archives: May 2015

Fifth Grade Summer Reading Recommendations

The Mysterious Benedict Society, by Trenton Lee Stewart
When this peculiar ad appears in the newspaper, dozens of children enroll to take a series of mysterious, mind-bending tests. (And you, dear reader, can test your wits right alongside them.) But in the end just four very special children will succeed. Their challenge: to go on a secret mission that only the most intelligent and resourceful children could complete. To accomplish it they will have to go undercover at the Learning Institute for the Very Enlightened, where the only rule is that there are no rules. (from publisher’s note)
The Night Gardener, by Jonathan Auxler
The Night Gardener follows two abandoned Irish siblings who travel to work as servants at a creepy, crumbling English manor house. But the house and its family are not quite what they seem. Soon the children are confronted by a mysterious spectre and an ancient curse that threatens their very lives. (from publisher’s note)
Hoot, by Carl Hiassen
The story takes place in Coconut Cove, Florida, where new arrival Roy makes a bad enemy, two oddball friends, and joins an effort to stop construction of a pancake house which would destroy a colony of burrowing owls who live on the site. (from publisher’s note)
The Nethergrim, by Matthew Jobin
Everyone in Moorvale believes the legend: The brave knight Tristan and the famed wizard Vithric, in an epic battle decades ago, had defeated the evil Nethergrim and his minions. To this day, songs are sung and festivals held in the heroes’ honor. Yet now something dark has crept over the village. First animals disappear, their only remains a pile of bones licked clean. Then something worse: children disappear. The whispers begin quietly yet soon turn into a shout: The Nethergrim has returned! (from publisher’s note)

Brown Girl Dreaming, by Jacqueline Woodson

Click here for an e-book edition available through the AWS Library

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become. (from publisher’s note)

Additional Recommendations
The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making, by Catherynne M. Valente

Inkheart, by Cornelia Funke

The Dead Boys, by Royce Buckingham

The Great Trouble, by Deborah Hopkinson | Click here for an e-book edition

Counting by 7s, by Holly Goldberg Sloan