Tag Archives: Kindergarten

Kindergarten Summer Reading Recommendations

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Night Animals, by Gianna Marino

Something’s out there in the dark!

First Possum hears it. Then Skunk. Then Wolf comes running.

“What could it possibly be?” asks Bat.

“Night Animals!” the animals declare.

“But you are night animals,” Bat informs this not-so-smart crew.
Children will love the oh-so-funny animals in this twist on a cozy bedtime book.

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Mercy Watson to the Rescue, by Kate DiCamillo

Click here to access a digital version through Annie Wright’s ebook collection.

To Mr. and Mrs. Watson, Mercy is not just a pig — she’s a porcine wonder. And to the good-natured Mercy, the Watsons are an excellent source of buttered toast, not to mention that buttery-toasty feeling she gets when she snuggles into bed with them. This is not, however, so good for the Watsons’ bed. BOOM! CRACK!

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Last Stop on Market Street, by Matt de la Peña and Christian Robinson (illus.)

Every Sunday after church, CJ and his grandma ride the bus across town. But today, CJ wonders why they don’t own a car like his friend Colby. Why doesn’t he have an iPod like the boys on the bus? How come they always have to get off in the dirty part of town? Each question is met with an encouraging answer from grandma, who helps him see the beauty—and fun—in their routine and the world around them.

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The Most Magnificent Thing, by Ashley Spires

Click here to access a digital version through Annie Wright’s ebook collection.

Award-winning author and illustrator Ashley Spires has created a charming picture book about an unnamed girl and her very best friend, who happens to be a dog. The girl has a wonderful idea. She is going to make the most MAGNIFICENT thing! She knows just how it will look. She knows just how it will work. All she has to do is make it, and she makes things all the time. Easy-peasy!? But making her magnificent thing is anything but easy, and the girl tries and fails, repeatedly. Eventually, the girl gets really, really mad. She is so mad, in fact, that she quits. But after her dog convinces her to take a walk, she comes back to her project with renewed enthusiasm and manages to get it just right.

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Mustache Baby, by Bridget Heos

When Baby Billy is born with a mustache, his family takes it in stride. They are reassured when he nobly saves the day in imaginary-play sessions as a cowboy or cop and his mustache looks good-guy great. But as time passes, their worst fears are confirmed when little Billy’s mustache starts to curl up at the ends in a suspiciously villainous fashion. Sure enough, “Billy’s disreputable mustache led him into a life of dreadful crime.” Plenty of tongue-in-cheek humor and cartoonish illustrations make this the perfect baby-shower gift for a mustachioed father-to-be.

Additional Recommendations

Spoon, by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

The Chicken of the Family, by Mary Amato and Delphine Durand (illus.)

Follow The Line To School, by Laura Ljungkvist

Warning: Do Not Open This Book, by Adam Lehrhaupt and Matthew Forsythe (illus.)

Kel Gilligan’s DareDevil Stuntshow, by Michael Buckley and Dan Santat (illus.) | Click here to access a digital version

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Mongolia, Wolves, and Reading & Running the World: (or, The Week in Library: 3!)

When I’m not in the library, I’m often on the run, enjoying the trails and roads of Point Defiance or exploring new hills in downtown. And when I’m on the run, I’m plugged into an audiobook. So strange, I think, to have my ventures narrated by The Devil in the White City, Americanah, or The Wind-Up Bird ChroniclePerhaps a good zombie thriller would help add some strength to my gait.

Since June, my run read of choice has been Wolf Totem, a 26 hour audio epic. While it took me 4 hours to truly adjust to a style which enrolls characters to serve as satellites for ideology (as many works of political literature do), I’m utterly enamored by the work, which was initially recommended to me by one of our Chinese international students last year. This 2004 publication by Jiang Rong is the second best selling book in all of Chinese history, with Mao’s Little Red Book the only other work to supersede it in sales.

With three hours left in my listening, I’m continually enchanted, gutted, and elated in this realistic account of the Chinese push to develop inner Mongolia during the Cultural Revolution, an act that severely set back the sustainable, spiritual, and ecology-minded existence of the nomadic peoples of that region.

Truly, this is a book that’s made me add miles to my daily outings on foot, and it’s raised my consciousness over cultural conflict and the rapid implementation of technology to habituate humans in environments that we had been so ecologically mindful of for thousands of years.

So, that’s my fiction recommendation for the week. Our collection features two editions of Wolf Totem: the original Chinese version and its English translation.

Here are a few recommendations from our collection that I hope will constellate around this choice!

NONFICTION

What the World Eats, by Faith D’Aluisio, Peter Menzel

JUNIOR FICTION

I Rode a Horse of Milk and White Jade,         by Diane Lee Wilson

JUNIOR NONFICTION

Mongolian Folktales, by Hilary Roe Metternich

ILLUSTRATED

Suho’s White Horse: A Mongolian Legend, Retold by Yuzo Otsuka

THE WEEK IN LIBRARY

My excitement over such readings trumped a chronicle of this week in library, although don’t fret: we’re dishing books, raising levels of information literacy, and providing inspirational and aspirational learning spaces for all the learners in AWS. My favorite moment of the week is when our Kindergarteners approached me with drawings and photographs of where they’ll keep our library books safe when they bring them home.

Safe Places for BooksSo lovely, this utter excitement over selecting books and hauling them home. With such research into proper book care, our Kindergarteners have unlocked this next ability in their library lives.

Besides that, we’ve been rolling with a few great read alouds and some energetic activities (‘let’s pretend we’re books, and let’s organize ourselves!’).

With our first full week, the library’s on the move!

Endnote

*Scribd is another great resource for ebooks and audiobooks available on subscription basis. I also scour local libraries (and our own collection at AWS–the username and password are exactly the same: your ID number).

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Kindergarten Summer Reading Recommendations

Ling & Ting: Not Exactly the Same! by Grace Lin

In Ling & Ting, Lin crafts a charming tale about a pair of Chinese-American twins who insist that, despite their physical appearance, they are NOT alike. (from publisher’s note)

Kel Gilligan’s DareDevil Stuntshow, by Michael Buckley and Dan Santat

Click here for an e-book edition available through the AWS Library

Narrated by Kel himself as he attempts his “stunts” with Evel Knievel–like flair, the story unfolds as a performance in which readers themselves become part of the audience, encouraging Kel to get dressed all by himself (without a net!), eat new foods like broccoli (eww!), and take a bath (gasp!). Bold, interactive, and downright silly, this is a book to make kids cheer and attempt some “stunts” of their own. (from publisher’s note)

The Adventures of Beetle: The Unimaginary Friend, by Dan Santat

This magical story begins on an island far away where an imaginary friend is born. He patiently waits his turn to be chosen by a real child, but when he is overlooked time and again, he sets off on an incredible journey to the bustling city, where he finally meets his perfect match and-at long last-is given his special name: Beekle. (from publisher’s note)

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, by William Joyce

Morris Lessmore loved words. He loved stories. He loved books. But every story has its upsets. Everything in Morris Lessmore’s life, including his own story, is scattered to the winds. But the power of story will save the day. (from publisher’s note)

Froodle, by Antoinette Portis

In a normal neighborhood, on a typical day, the birds chirp, the dogs bark and the cats meow. When Little Brown Bird decides she doesn’t want to sing the same old song, out comes a new tune that shakes up the neighborhood and changes things forever in this funny, innovative book that kids will love to read outloud. (from publisher’s note)

Additional Recommendations

Rabbit and Robot: The Sleepover, by Cece Bell

Wolfie the Bunny, by Ame Dyckman & Zachariah OHora (illus.)

Unicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great, by Bob Shea

Zorro Gets an Outfit, by Carter Goodrich

Duck! Rabbit! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal & Tom Litchenheld | Click here for an e-book edition

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