Tag Archives: make

The Summer in Library

With August upon us, the Library & Learning Commons is preparing for another great year for the Annie Wright community. Throughout the summer, we have been continuing to evolve our space to best suit our patrons and the role our space plays within school life.

For all the library fans out there, here are few updates regarding the projects we’re rushing to complete for the start of the year.

Named for Albert Sutton, who was the architect of the Annie Wright Seminary and whose son John Sutton was the architect for the Library

Named for Albert Sutton, who was the architect of the Annie Wright Seminary and whose son John Sutton was the architect for the Library

The Sutton Room

As a space for both our library archives and community connections, the Sutton Room already holds the most historic books in our school collection. As we have transitioned this space into an archival center, we have decided to integrate our Reference collection into the main library, and we have been re-cataloging, re-labeling, and moving these items throughout the summer months. This should create enough shelf space to hold one or two of our historic periodicals. We hold over 100 years of National Geographic and many decades of Life Magazine elsewhere in the building.

Additionally, we will complete our installation of the teleconference equipment that helps make the Sutton Room a center for community engagement. Last year alone, we connected with alumni, task force members, and other schools on 15 occasions, and we hope to demonstrate how we might open school walls from this space in our learning commons.

Wayfinding

This summer, our 3D printer has been bustling with letters that we’ll use for signage throughout the library space. As a library that teaches information literacy, we really struggle with nailing down wayfinding philosophy: how easy should we make book finding experience for students? Ultimately, we have decided to take a few steps to label sections, and we think the 3D printed letters will look rather spiffy on the library walls.
http://www.mobypicture.com/static/flash/player.swf

The Sound-Sensitive Bulletin Board!

Ok! That video above may not look as awesome as it will in a few weeks, but it’s shaping up to be pretty cool. Over the last few months, the Library Team have been teaching ourselves Arduino (click here for a quick introduction). When our bulletin board is up and running, we’ll have a sign that spells “READ” outside our library doors. If the hallway is relatively quiet for 3 seconds, the ‘R’ will light up. 3 more seconds? The ‘E.’ 3 more the ‘A,’ and 3 more the ‘D.’ If any noise occurs during that sequence, the sign will go dark and start counting again!

We aren’t necessarily fans of quiet libraries, but we thought this would be a cool way to showcase what one can do with a little coding, electrical engineering, and creativity.

And more! 

Besides those items, we’ve spent the summer developing curricula, planning acquisitions, sifting through archives, and making plans for minor Maker activities throughout the year. This school year’s going to be something else, and we’re excited to see the halls filled with learners so soon!

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2015 Lower School Summer Reading Recommendations!

Dear AWS Parents and Community Members,

Summer presents itself with such wonderful opportunities for informal reading and learning. Our children have more chances to freely dive into the topics, activities, and stories that do not always fit into the hectic pace of school life. What follows is a list of non-required reading recommendations that I hope will capture the interests and imaginations for our rising Preschool through Fifth Grade students.

Many of these will serve as perfect launchpads for a summer flush with learning, creation, and imagination. I hope you consider sharing these stories with your children through read alouds and conversations, as this is one of the most proven ways for parents to encourage academic success in children of all ages. Each title also presents opportunity for an accompanying activity, whether our young readers write a sequel, invent new stories with the same theme, or tackle a project that may have been presented within the narrative.

For more reading recommendations and techniques, you may consider Jim Trelease’s The Read Aloud Handbook or Diane F. Frankenstein’s Reading Together. We have copies of these in our library should you wish to check them out this summer.

Likewise, you may be interested in pursuing guides like UnBored: the Essential Field Guide to Serious Fun and Tinkerlab: A Hands On Guide for Little Inventors. These are flush with ideas for summer projects you may like to explore with your child, the projects will surely spark new interests and develop invaluable skills.

Additionally, there are many summer reading events and activities planned at our local public libraries, and they themselves are great resources for reading recommendations, as well. Here are links to the children’s programming for several local libraries:

Tacoma Public Library

Pierce County Public Library

Kitsap Regional Library

Timberland Regional Library

If you have any questions regarding reading opportunities, suggestions, or activities, never hesitate to e-mail us: library@aw.org.

Thanks for a great year of reading and learning. We’ll be excited to reopen the library in August.

All the best,

Joe Romano

Library Media Specialist

Reading Lists for Rising Grade Levels

Preschool and PreKindergarten

Kindergarten

First Grade

Second Grade

Third Grade

Fourth Grade

Fifth Grade

A note on these lists:

When available, we have provided links to the e-book editions of our summer reading recommendations, as many of them are available through Overdrive, our digital lending service. You can access these titles through your home computer, an e-reader, a tablet device like the iPad or the Kindle Fire, or even your smartphone. Click here to learn how your device can access our e-reading services. During this process, you will be prompted to enter your student’s username and password. This username and password are both your student’s AWS ID number. If you need assistance in accessing OverDrive, please visit our library or send along an e-mail, and we are more than happy to help.
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